top of page
Search

Mighty oaks – from little acorns grow

Since autumn is upon us, I thought it was a good time to talk about acorns. They are simply everywhere at the moment (especially if you live in the countryside and enjoy walking like me).


The acorn, nut of the oak tree, has a very rich history of symbolism and can be found in Celtic and Nordic traditions where it represents immortality, fertility, and life. In Norse mythology, Thor's tree of life was an oak tree and associated with the Gods of storm, thunder, and lightning. The Druids believed that eating acorns would help them see the future and one translation of the word druid is "oak knowledge". In more modern druidry, the acorn is used as a symbol of sustainability and permaculture.


Acorns also appear in the folklore of witches who were said to exchange acorns as they passed in the wood as a sign that that were in safe company. I don't know about witches but I've certainly collected a few hundred in the past on my walks through the woods.


At this time of the year, I tend to have a bowl full of them in my house somewhere but apparently, a hanging acorn is said to ward off premature aging too so perhaps I should try it.



From a biological perspective, the acorn means new life and by extension youth and potential... everything to make a giant oak tree is contained within the acorn. It's image is often used to represent growth, perseverance and stability. The oak tree is often the biggest in the forest and can live up to 1000 years. Just imagine the stories that one single oak tree could tell us if it were able to talk...!


The acorn and indeed the cycle of an oak tree is seasonal and so another lesson we can take from it is about the importance of dormancy and rest to help us flourish. Perhaps we can use this idea to reflect on the challenges of recent months.


One way or another, the acorn manages to find itself in contexts of positivity, prosperity and good luck! With such abundance of positive significance, you can see why I think it's special. As a teacher, I want to help you unlock your potential and grow into a mighty oak tree.


"Mighty oaks – from little acorns grow" - 14th Century proverb

Did you know that the oak tree is also England's national tree? This acorn can be found in the market town of Much Wenlock, Shropshire.

Comments


bottom of page